Product Review: What is Iodine?

 

Dean Hendrickson, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVS, professor of equine surgery at Colorado State University in Fort Collins said that although owners’ and vets’ intentions are good, “most wound-cleaning agents and techniques will cause chemical or mechanical trauma to the wound bed,”  “Weigh the benefits of cleaning the wound against the trauma that agent will cause,” he adds.

 TENDING YOUR HORSE’S WOUNDS: Know the best ways in taking care of your horse’s wounds and the great role of iodine in wound treatments!

Whether in close and open spaces, horses unabashedly practiced the art of sustaining mess and cuts for centuries --- running, leaping, and hopping through brushes, into fences, and even on their stablemates. This is why, horse owners and veterinarians tried a variety of ways to tend wounds such as administering ointments, salves, cleansers, and dressings. One study cited that horse wounds have a greater risk of becoming infected due to their environment. Wounds are exposed to pathogens and bacteria, growing within the damaged skin. Some of these microorganisms are hard to identify and may be resistant to antibiotics. Failure to attend the infected wounds can cause horses to experience increased pain, swelling, and redness and would immediately escalate to nausea, chills, or fever. Thus, early and proper wound therapy should be carefully observed.

WOUND CARE TIPS:

The initial action would be rinsing the wound well. Clear out dirt and debris such as hair, rope fibers, metal or wood fragments, and dead tissue. A compression bandage can help stop excessive bleeding. For cleansing and disinfecting, you need to research a lot about what cleaning agent to use to avoid retarding the wound-healing.

Dean Hendrickson, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVS, professor of equine surgery at Colorado State University in Fort Collins said that although owners’ and vets’ intentions are good, “most wound-cleaning agents and techniques will cause chemical or mechanical trauma to the wound bed,”  “Weigh the benefits of cleaning the wound against the trauma that agent will cause,” he adds.

IODINE IN TREATING WOUNDS

For more than a hundred years, iodine is a highly effective topical antimicrobial that has been clinically used in treating wounds. It is a dark violet, non-metallic element that is naturally occurring in humans, seawater, fishes, oysters, certain seaweeds and vegetables. Although iodine’s exact antimicrobial mode of action is not full, the research identified that its different concentrations can affect ‘fibroblasts,’ which have a pivotal role in wound healing.