Pain management for Ponies

 

"all animals are entitled to five freedoms: freedom from hunger and thirst; freedom from discomfort; freedom to express normal behavior; freedom from fear and distress; and freedom from pain, injury, and disease" Start protecting your horse!

 MANAGING INFLAMMATORY AND PAINFUL CONDITIONS IN HORSE’S: Knowing the best treatment in managing your horse painful agony.

Whether your horse needs to have a short-term or long-term treatment following an injury or a chronic disease, pain management plays a crucial role in the animal’s optimal recovery aside from depression and stress.

"According to the Farm Animal Welfare Council), all animals are entitled to five freedoms: freedom from hunger and thirst; freedom from discomfort; freedom to express normal behavior; freedom from fear and distress; and freedom from pain, injury, and disease..." says William W. Muir III, DVM, MS, Ph.D., Dipl. ACVA (anesthesia), ACVECC (emergency and critical care).

Studies have shown that chronic pain can modify the nervous system, can become an actual disease, and cause distress. Uncontrolled pain can have a negative impact on its behavior, performance, immune system, appetite, and tissue healing. The horse’s pain tolerance and how a horse shows pain may also vary based on its age, previous experience, and environment.

Recognizing pain in horses will be much of a challenge, but you can try looking at these classic signs:
• High heart rate
• High breathing rate
• Dilated pupils
• Ears being partially or fully back (not necessarily pinned)
• Changes in behavior: restlessness, agitation, head-shaking, signs of aggression, depression or dullness, etc. 
• Lameness
• Signs of colic: rolling, pawing, kicking, pacing, etc.
• Fixed stare with wide nostrils and clenched facial muscles.

PAIN MANAGEMENT:
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or also known as “NSAIDs” are the most commonly used drug in managing acute or chronically active pain in horses. These drugs particularly control inflammatory responses within two hours of administration.  Other pain relief options are also available and are often used in combination with NSAIDs. Some of these can be given orally whereas others can only be given by injection with the assistance of a veterinary surgeon.